Translate to:

Haven't seen these in a while and have forgotten how we handled them. I think it's a model 20. What kind of fixture can be used to replace this??

Thanks

Views: 1748

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Hank

I remember these lights from years ago. I'm not certain, but I believe Anthony used Swimquip lights.

Pentair may have a replacement.

Some light companies have adapter plates to convert to smaller LED light.

Securing a replacement light properly to the existing niche is paramount. The set screw must secure the fixture properly so it cannot be pulled out by a bather, and also for proper bonding. This last aspect is SUPER important!

It's a good idea to have a certified individual to perform a bond test. It protects you and your customer. Also, by code, the light must be GFCI protected.

Anthony generally used a GFCI receptacle to protect the pool lights. The receptacles always seemed to be very low to the ground.

Problem is the GFCI's fail at some point due to the elements. Bubble cover requirements are fairly new to protect receptacles.

Yeah,I get all that. Been doing pools for over 40 years! Pentair is very careful not to make recommendations. The (Aladdin) adapter rings don't fit the Anthony niche, at least not well. I believe I have found the old Swimquip part number for the smaller light (8 1/2") 05082-0050 (50' cord, 12V) that can still be ordered.

Thanks for your reply and assistance!

Hank,

I just pulled an Anthony model 21 pool light. I'm looking for a replacement pool light that will fit my existing pool niche. I have included some photos for your comments. The pool supply houses I've dealt with recommend installing new Pentair plaster repair ring. I have more photos if needed

Bill

Attachments:

My best guess is going to be the Sta-Rite part# 05082-0025 (for 25' cord) 0050 (for 50' cord) -0100 (for 100' cord) I'm in a 12v market but this is the same light except for 120V.

Part of the problem is that because of U.L listing and other regulations, manufacturer's cannot recommend any light not tested by UL for the receiving niche. Also, for liability reasons in the event of some kind of problem resulting in damage, injury or death. So I am adding a disclaimer that while this light will physically fir in the niche, it is not sold for that purpose.

Thank you so much for your comments Hank. I plan on having a certified electrician do the installation and conduct grounding and bonding tests. I completely understand the liability issues stated by manufacturer and your disclaimer. 

Bill

Hank is right about UL listing, etc..

Keep in mind also regarding the bonding, the screw that secures the light to the niche completes the bonding of the light itself for both stainless and PVC niches. The plaster ring you showed must be bonded along with the existing niche. It gets a little tricky.

GFCI PROTECT THE LIGHT FIXTURE!!!

RSS

Sign in

E-mail

Password
 or Sign Up
By signing in, you agree to the amended Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.
Forgotten your password?

Events

Latest Activity

kevox712 is now a member of Pool Genius Network
yesterday
Kim Skinner commented on Kim Skinner's blog post Plaster Finishes Should Last 20 Years
"Thanks Kevin, I like hearing that there are good plaster companies out there, and that they do good…"
yesterday
Kevin Misley commented on Kim Skinner's blog post Plaster Finishes Should Last 20 Years
"Great info Kim. My plaster contractor will tent my pools if any threat of rain is present and also…"
Sunday
Lyle Watson replied to Ben Jewell's discussion Open Pit DE Vacuum Filters
"I worked on several of these systems, many, many years ago. Are you still seeking…"
Friday
Richard A. Falk commented on Richard A. Falk's group Water Chemistry
"Thanks Lester.  This is actually the second time they ran the article describing the history…"
Feb 12
Lester Eric Brehm commented on Richard A. Falk's group Water Chemistry
"Congratulations for getting some credit for your work on CYA in Service Industry News ! !"
Feb 12
Kevin Misley replied to John McGehee's discussion Issues with using rainwater for everything pool construction and maintenance related
"John About 7-8 years ago, I was asked by a GC to bid on a project whereas a college was expanding…"
Feb 12
Kim Skinner posted a blog post

Plaster Finishes Should Last 20 Years

All pool plaster finishes should last 20 years or more. However, some last only 5 to 7 years, and…See More
Feb 11

© 2019   Created by PGN Admin.   Powered by Pool Genius Network

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

Offline

Live Video